The Jura Z10 Review: A Super-Automatic Espresso Machine That Can Now Make a Cold Brew?

Note: The Jura Z10 is a brand-new super-automatic espresso machine that isn’t yet available from Amazon in the United States. However, its predecessor, the Jura Z8, is available on Amazon for just over $4,000.

Note: The Jura Z10 is a brand-new super-automatic espresso machine that isn’t yet available from Amazon in the United States. However, its predecessor, the Jura Z8, is available on Amazon for just over $4,000.

If we dedicate a livestream to a super-automatic espresso machine, you know it must be an exceptional model. The has definitely earned this special treatment in my super-automatic espresso machine review 2021.

Not only because it can brew a cold brew — or at least this is the claim — but also because we’re dealing with an electronic grinder, superb programming and excellent cup results.

As much as I wish I could have written a review without any complaints, that would mean overlooking the fact that a super-automatic espresso machine and the cold brew principle are mutually exclusive.

In addition, Jura coffee machines would have had to finally stop coming up with stupid names and abbreviations for simple (and self-evident) things like the energy-saving mode and the pre-brewing system.

If that was the case, then yes, it would quickly become understandable why Jura coffee machines now get two thumbs up from me. Then again, there’s always something, right?

Great innovation.

Jura Z10

Jura delivers an all-round success with excellent innovations in the Z10.

Very high-quality design

Fully electronically controllable

Much quieter electronic grinder

Hot and cold coffee

Excellent espresso and milk foam

No milk container included

“Cold brew” is misleading

Table of Contents

Jura Z10 at a Glance: Jura’s Best Model Yet?

The Jura Z series is the Swiss manufacturer’s innovative playground. Even older “classics” like the Jura Z6 are currently way ahead of the competition in terms of features, functionality, specialty coffees and artificial intelligence.

The brewing unit, pressure and WiFi Connect function are also the same in all Z series machines. Even the marketing terminology like “Pulse Extraction Process,” “Aroma Selection” or “3D Brewing” technology don’t change significantly from model to model. Beyond that, Jura coffee machines match up in the following ways:

  1. Aluminum front and plastic housing
  2. Operation via app, display and rotary switch — the Z6 doesn’t have a touch screen
  3. Cappuccinatore as a milk frother — container not included
  4. Infinitely variable grind settings
  5. Brewing unit permanently installed
  6. Coffee strength adjustable in 10 stages
  7. Coffee temperature adjustable in three stages
  8. Milk and milk foam temperature adjustable in 10 stages
  9. Dual-spout, height- and width-adjustable
  10. Illuminated water tank and cup pedestal
  11. 15 bar of pressure

For me, the continuously variable electronic Product Recognizing Grinder (PRG) is the Jura Z10’s most important innovation. So, what we currently get in the Jura Giga 6 for almost $6,000 will also soon be available for a much more reasonable price — this is nothing new, though.

A cold coffee on ice from the Jura Z10 automatic coffee machine

According to Jura, though, you should get way more excited about another invention.

With the Cold Brew Process or Cold Extraction Process, it’s possible — for the first time — to obtain a cold espresso, coffee or Lungo. The milk foam isn’t exactly mentioned in this context, but you can set it to a very low temperature by default. That means an ice-cold Latte Macchiato or Cappuccino is also possible.

CategoryEntry
Manufacturer Jura
NameZ10
TypeSuper-automatic espresso machine
Removable brew groupNo
Casing MaterialPlastic / aluminum
Milk frothing systemAutomatic, cappuccinatore
DisplayYes
AppYes
User profilesYes
Water tank capacity81.15 oz / 2.41 L
Maximum discharge height5.9 in / 15 cm
GrinderStainless steel cone grinder
Bean container capacity19.9 oz / 281 g
Two bean compartmentsYes
GrindingInfinite
Coffee drinks prepared at the touch of a button32
Adjustable coffee temperatureYes
Milk (foam) temperature adjustableYes
2-cup functionYes
Hot water functionYes
Hot milk functionYes
Obtain milk foam onlyYes
Water filterYes
Weight28.6 lbs / 13 kg
Dimensions (height x width x depth)15 x 12.5 x 17.7 in / 38 x 32 x 45 cm

In offering this feature, Jura may not have realized that “cold brew espresso” is a complete contradiction in terms — or they simply accept it. Either way, this opens a completely new dimension in functionality that we must delve into detail.

The design of the Jura Z10 is also worth a mention. Our review device in Dark Inox (aka Black) or the alternative in Aluminum White (aka Silver) both look really great and extremely high-end.

The Jura Z10 super-automatic espresso machine’s design features at a glance

Now, for the questionable aspects. 

You could almost overlook the fact that Jura once again chooses not to include a container for the HP3 milk system. Or that the brewing unit is permanently installed. Not to mention the fact that you need a translator to get through the Jura marketing department’s baloney:

  • Product Recognizing Grinder (PRG) — The grind can be adjusted electronically and automatically.
  • Pulse Extraction Process (PEP) — The water is regulated in the brewing unit, depending on the extraction phase.
  • Specialty Selection Menu — Your “cockpit” for each coffee, though you could also just call it “selection options.”
  • Cool Control — A stupid term for the expensive, external milk container purchased separately. It’s also equipped with “Wireless Connect.”
  • WiFi Connect — A retrofittable adapter that makes the super-automatic machine WLAN-compatible. It comes included in the Z10.
  • Jura Operating Experience (JOE) — The Jura app. A play on the slang word for coffee. Sweet.
  • Energy Save Mode (ESM) — The energy-saving mode that almost every coffee machine now has. Groundbreaking.
  • Intelligent Water System (IWS) — Monitors the water system’s Claris Smart filter cartridge.
  • Intelligent Pre-Brew Aroma System (IPBAS) — Pre-infusion for an even simpler pre-brewing system. It’s good for the aroma.
  • 3D Brewing Technology — “Allows the water to flow evenly through the ground coffee at multiple levels. This makes the most of the aroma, both in hot specialities and with cold brewing.” Uh, OK.
  • One-Touch Lungo Function — Press it once for a “longer” coffee (which means “lighter” at Jura, so the resulting coffee is thinner).
  • Fine Foam Technology — No air bubbles. Nice and compact. That’s actually true for once.

What’s so difficult about being specific about extraction time, brewing temperature, water hardness or pressure anyway? Is Jura afraid that all those features will turn out to be self-evident or not-so-groundbreaking in practice?

Setting Up the Jura Z10: Does More Technology Equal Better Coffee?

Should you get really bored, you can spend all day clicking through the various Jura Z10 menu specialties. You could also adjust every little aspect from foam to brewing temperature, to the heating system and the automatic ESM

To achieve all this, you can use your smartphone, stick to the touch-friendly color display or use the classic rotary switch with its so-called Blue Crystal design. Each method is fairly easy to pick up without an instruction manual and, according to Jura, is now better than ever:

  1. The touch-friendly color display is supposed to be twice as fast. To me, that just means that the previous versions were twice as lame.
  2. JOE and the machine now talk to each other via a WiFi connection instead of Bluetooth. If you already have the app installed, it takes no time to get the Jura Z10 update from the App Store. 

WiFi is generally more stable than Bluetooth, and we also benefit from the fine-grained programming. So, with the Jura Z10, you really can sit comfortably on the couch while you program an extra shot into your Cappuccino or tend to the temperature of the milk in your flat white.

That said, I had to press “reconnect” often during the review. Still, I am a big smartphone fan, especially when it comes to quickly changing the grind setting according to the coffee type or annoying things like setting the water hardness for the descaling program. 

Beginners, on the other hand, will certainly be overwhelmed by the many setting options at first. Obviously, if coffee specialties can be customized down to the last drop, that also means a lot of tinkering with setting adjustments to get the best out of each coffee type.

However, adjusting the milk foam temperature or extraction time is for more advanced users. The first thing you should look at is the RPG, which, like all the other functions, is wonderfully easy to adjust via a sliding scale.

We know that changing the grind is the most important adjustment we can make on a coffee machine. For this reason alone, I think that Jura should focus much more on its PRG than on the Cold Brew Process.

Coffee beans in the Jura Z10 super-automatic coffee machine’s bean container

If they did, then the Swiss might as well point out that the new electronic grinder is audibly quieter than its conical brethren in the Z6 and Z8. We measured 65.8 decibels with the Z10; other Jura models are just under 70 decibels.

For the grind settings, I kept picking different ones for almost every test coffee, even if I ended up staying somewhere in the middle — the best zone for enhancing chocolate notes in espresso. I adjusted the fill volume to an optimal 25 milliliters (0.85 fluid ounces) for espresso and 120 milliliters (4 fluid ounces) for coffee.

However, with the bean strength (aka ground coffee amount), I mainly stayed at level four out of 10. For fun, we also drank a level 10 espresso during the livestream. We were awake for three days after that.

As always with this manufacturer, as of late, you’ll have to get used to thinking about water differently with the Jura Z10 automatic coffee machine.

Here’s the gist: the Swiss refer to the amount of water that’s in the cup. So, when it comes to water as an additional ingredient for specialties like an Americano, they refer to that as bypass water.

Jura Z10: Espresso, Coffee & Cold Brew?

Actually, cold brew from a super-automatic espresso machine shouldn’t work at all and should taste awful. In fact, features like this are just a marketing ploy to get you to buy it.

Yet, I have to give it to the Swiss. It works and tastes good. Go figure.

The “cold brew espresso” turns out decidedly creamy, even if I’m still not used to the lukewarm mouthfeel — it immediately reminded Mauricio of tiramisu. So, if you’re in the mood for some yummy, fattening stuff, you can run the cold specialties straight into a tub of ice cream. Tasty!

That said, I still maintain that the term used for this innovation is completely wrong. True cold brew is created in a full immersion process that takes up to 24 hours. The coffee grounds are suspended in cold water, and the slow extraction brings out fruit aromas perfectly. You then filter out the grounds, ending up with a cold brew concentrate.

The Jura Z10 simply turns off the heating block, takes some pressure out of the process and allows the water to drip a little more slowly through the puck in the brewing unit. A “coldpresso” (and that’s what I’ll call it from now on!) only takes about two minutes to extract.

Cold espresso drips slowly from the Jura Z10 super-automatic coffee machine spout

While chilled milk doesn’t come out of the milk spout, you can simply turn the temperature down enough (and pour it over ice) to make a cold Cappuccino or flat white. No problems there.

However, if you’re not a fan of cold specialties, the novelty value will soon wear off. Still, the mere fact that you have the option at all makes the Jura Z10 a review winner — in a niche it has created for itself.

If we now turn to the “boring” hot specialties, this Jura coffee machine definitely doesn’t disappoint. As we’ve come to expect, the espresso shows up full-bodied, well-rounded, chocolatey and with a superb temperature. Likewise, the regular coffee is anything but watery with my settings.

Milk Foam: Many Opportunities to Play

There’s really no need to talk about the milk foam itself with Jura super-automatic espresso machines as the quality has reached a level that will delight fans of any milk-based coffee specialties. Just know that when Jura talks about “fine foam,” you can take it literally.

If you want, you can set the milk foam temperature daringly high and completely customize the ratio of milk to milk foam.

During our livestream, a user shared his recipe for a flat white. He tried it out with the Jura Z8, and we adapted the settings for the Jura Z10. I have to say, we enjoyed it very much:

  • Coffee strength eight out of 10
  • Espresso 45 milliliters (1.5 fluid ounces)
  • Milk foam 14 seconds
  • No milk
  • Fine grind
A close-up of a Latte Macchiato from the Jura Z10 super-automatic espresso machine

As you can see, the milk foam is specified here in seconds. We’ve gotten used to this by now, but we still can’t precisely track the amount. Nevertheless, here’s the conversion we’ve come up with so far:

  • 1 second of hot milk = 6 grams (0.2 ounces) = 5.8 milliliters (0.19 fluid ounces)
  • 1 second of milk foam = 4 – 5 grams (0.14 – 0.17 ounces)

Note that 200 milliliters (6.75 fluid ounces) of milk takes about 35 seconds. So, since milk foam has a larger volume, the time will be correspondingly shorter. For example, when making a Cappuccino, I set it to 14 seconds of foam.

Cleaning: High Quality Always Pays Off

In my opinion, the quality of the Jura Z10 automatic coffee machine becomes especially apparent when you take it apart for cleaning.

The first thing that should catch your eye is the super-heavy drip tray. Even with the coffee grounds container empty, this thing is as heavy and massive as we’ve ever seen on any device. That’s a definite plus because it tells us a lot about the material quality.

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The aroma protection lid on the bean hopper is also worth a mention. It seals to the rim of the container with a rubber ring. Thus, actually allowing fewer molecules to escape. However, you should be careful that the seal doesn’t become brittle. So, if you’re cleaning the bean compartment area, I’d recommend doing it by hand.

Moving on to the water tank, with its sleek light, it has an elegant wave design. What’s important to me is that the design is only on the outer surface. Water residue in design indents always leads to unwanted deposits, but you don’t have to worry about that here.

The Jura Z10 automatic coffee maker’s water tank

I know from experience that the Claris filter cartridge is very high quality, so descaling a Jura coffee maker is very easy. You can also check the maintenance status via smartphone, but you need to stand at the machine to perform the descaling program. No problem. All you have to do is follow the instructions on the touch screen display.

Once again, each cleaning program can be individually controlled, but rinses take place whether you want them to or not. Of course, I have nothing against that — it’s not like the drain tray and the tank aren’t big enough.

On the subject of the fixed brewing unit, I will abstain from a final decision until my year-long Jura A1 experiment is over, and I have disassembled the device down to the heating system and combination spout.

Then we’ll see how effective the Jura cleaning program actually is. Of course, we’ll use the machine throughout and perform all the prescribed everyday cleaning as well.

Conclusion on the Jura Z10: An Extra Shot of Innovation for Spoiled Customers

In the video, I mentioned how excited I was about the Jura Z10’s cold brew function about 50 times. You might think that’s an exaggeration, but it’s just a symptom of Jura’s marketing infatuation with super-automatic espresso machines.

Great innovation!

Jura Z10

Jura delivers an all-round success with excellent innovations in the Z10.

Very high-quality design

Fully electronically controllable

Much quieter electronic grinder

Hot and cold coffee

Excellent espresso and milk foam

No milk container included

“Cold brew” is misleading

Even though I hate stupid marketing talk, and the Jura Z10 is full of it, that’s almost the only thing that really bothers me about this great device.

The PRG alone would be a good enough reason for a recommendation — the technology behind it, with all its adjustment options, is all top-notch, in my opinion. The Jura Z10 is a luxury sled, where you can sit in the cockpit yourself and get everything out of your coffee beans. Really, everything.

No matter which model you choose, Dark Inoxor Aluminum White, each is indeed full indulgence. So, why do I need nonsense like the PEP or IWS or IPBAS? Because if you’re willing to spend more than two bucks on a kitchen appliance, you should have the opportunity to really understand it before you buy it.

Compared to other machines in the Z series, the Jura Z10 definitely makes another leap — but perhaps not the “quantum leap” that Jura makes it out to be. Let’s just keep our feet on the ground.

Still, if you already own a Jura Z6 or E8 super-automatic coffee machine, you’re not missing out on anything by sticking with it. Cold specialties and PRG or not, the Jura-typical coffee taste is the same in all versions.

That still leaves the question of price. Compared to many other super-automatic espresso machines in my coffee machine review, Z series models are definitely expensive. This becomes especially clear in the upper-class Jura vs DeLonghi duel.

Currently, no other manufacturer focuses as much on excellent extraction. No other machine manages as aromatic a Cortado or Lungo as a Z series model from Jura. On top of that, the Jura Z10 comes with a whole battery of new coffee specialties that you can play around with and enjoy.

For these reasons alone, I give it full points despite feeling like the PRG and ESM can take a hike!

What about you? Have you had any experience with the Jura Z10 yet? I look forward to your comments!

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